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Welcome to the StormSurge page! This webpage includes lesson plans, interactive activities, powerpoint presentations and an interactive game that help students gain a better understanding of the coastal hazards of hurricanes and associated storm surge, as well as modeling and scientific visualizations. These materials were created by Discovery Hall Programs and the Northern Gulf Coastal Hazards Collaboratory to help communicate the nature of risks associated with living in coastal areas, especially during hurricane events.

Storm surge, a rise in water level due to various factors, is often the deadliest part of a hurricane. During Hurricane Katrina, a storm surge that reached 28 feet in some communities contributed to the death of over 2000 people. In a 2013 study by Grinsted et al., Katrina-like surge events are predicted to increase two to seven times with every 1°C change in global temperature. With global temperatures on the rise and coastal populations increasing every year, educating people about coastal hazards such as storm surge is of the utmost importance.

This website provides access to educational products created for use in K-16 classrooms nationwide. Please feel free to browse our lesson plans and use the lesson plans and resoures in your classroom! If you have any feedback about these educational activities, please feel free to contact us!

Student Resources Teacher Resources Surge Game NGCHC Contact Us
         
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This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation EPSCoR Grant Numbers EPS- 1010640, EPS-1010607, # EPS-1010578 and by the states of Louisiana, Alabama and Mississippi.
Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
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